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If you’ve visited the Press website in the past three weeks you’ve probably noticed that the Fall 2012 e-Catalog is live. (And if you haven’t been to our homepage lately, what are you waiting for?!) Featuring 50 titles and spanning a range of categories, the e-Catalog provides an interesting – and interactive – peek at the books the Press will be publishing in the upcoming months…


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Maurice Sendak (photo: Federico Novaro/flickr cc) Maurice Sendak, the renowned children’s book author best known for Where the Wild Things Are, passed away last Tuesday morning at the age of 83. On a day that included many remembrances and tributes across the literary world, U-M Press author Ellen Handler Spitz (Illuminating Childhood) was a guest on NPR’s Madeleine Brand Show to speak about Sendak’s life and work.




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Guest blogger Dennis Wild is the author of the newly published The Double-Crested Cormorant: Symbol of Ecological Conflict, which tells how, after cormorant populations rebounded from near-extinction driven by DDT contamination, these amazing birds were persecuted throughout their entire range  because of their perceived threat to American fishing interests. Today’s double-crested cormorants face the challenge of being referred to as “overabundant.” Their numbers had been so low for so long that more than one human generation…

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In a front-page article, The New York Times examines Lenore Romney—former First Lady of Michigan, and mother to Mitt—and explores how her experiences, views, and personality traits helped shape the current candidate for the Republican presidential nomination. In doing so, the Times looks to Elly Peterson, one of the highest-ranking women in the Republican Party and a confidante to both Lenore and Governor George Romney, and the subject of the 2012 Michigan Notable Book award-winning…

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Sara Pugach, author of Africa in Translation: A History of Colonial Linguistics in Germany and Beyond, 1814-1945, guest blogs about the stereotypes that continue to pervade discussions about Africa and the conflicts taking place on the continent. In today’s world, people often like to believe that we have gotten beyond the racial stereotyping and prejudices that blighted the past and led to atrocities like the Holocaust.  Yet the stereotypes and prejudices of the past have…

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Stephen T. Ziliak, co-author with Deirdre n. McCloskey of The Cult of Statistical Significance: How the Standard Error Costs Us Jobs, Justice, and Lives, is the subject of a Chicago Magazine blog post on “Guinness beer and Guinnessometrics.” The Chicago piece summarizes Ziliak’s paper in the Journal of Wine Economics, which focuses on the work on an early 20th-century chemist-turned-brewer at Guinness. After a discussion of the experiments undertaken by William Sealy Gosset–aka “Student”–testing the…

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Congratulations to Jill Dolan, author of The Feminist Spectator as Critic (1991), Presence and Desire (1994), and Utopia in Performance (2005) and editor of A Menopausal Gentleman (2011), for winning the prestigious 2011 George Jean Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism. The award, administered by Cornell University, carries a $10,000 prize and was bestowed upon Dolan for her insightful essays on her blog, The Feminist Spectator. This marks the first year the award has been given…

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University of Michigan Press author Bill Talen presented his unique brand of evangelism last week at Busboys & Poets in Washington, DC. Previewing the event, where Talen discussed his Reverend Billy persona and recent book, The Reverend Billy Project: From Rehearsal Hall to Super Mall with the Church of Life After Shopping, the Washington Post’s free daily Express looked at Talen’s history as a performer.